Pro act group – Proact Now http://proactnow.org/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 13:15:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://proactnow.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-icon-32x32.png Pro act group – Proact Now http://proactnow.org/ 32 32 Match Group calls on Congress to pass Respect for Marriage Act https://proactnow.org/match-group-calls-on-congress-to-pass-respect-for-marriage-act/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 12:33:52 +0000 https://proactnow.org/match-group-calls-on-congress-to-pass-respect-for-marriage-act/

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Dallas-based Match Group, which owns a portfolio of popular online dating services including Match.com, Tinder and OKCupid, led an advocacy campaign calling for passage of the Respect for Marriage Act.

Driving the news: The Respect for Marriage Act, a bill to codify protections for same-sex and interracial marriage, removed a major procedural hurdle in the US Senate last week after garnering enough support from Senate Republicans.

Why is this important: The bill was introduced in July after Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas pointed out in a concurring opinion in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization that decisions such as Obergefell v. Hodges, who legalized same-sex marriage, could be threatened.

What is happening: An ad campaign on Tinder highlighted LGBTQ+ couples who got married after meeting on the app and asked users to contact their senators.

  • In September, Match Group’s director of business and legal affairs, Jared Sine, also wrote an op-ed urging passage of the legislation.
  • “We remain committed to doing everything we can to ensure that no American wonders if their right to be authentic themselves and to love who they love will ever be taken away from them,” Sine wrote.
  • “Unless everyone’s right to marriage is protected by bipartisan legislation, no marriage is safe.”

The context: This is not the first time Match Group has taken a stand on a political issue. Last year, the company publicly opposed Texas’ strict abortion laws, launching a “pro-choice” badge that users could display on their profiles.

What they say : “Match Group’s advocacy efforts aim to uplift people by promoting equality and standing up for vulnerable groups in an effort to positively impact lives,” said Justine Sacco, corporate communications director. , in Axios.

The other side: Senator Ted Cruz and Senator John Cornyn oppose the bill.

And after: The Senate has yet to pass the bill and it must return to the House before it can go to President Joe Biden, who has urged Congress to send the bill to his desk “quickly” and said he would sign it.

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Leading Immigrant Advocacy Group Releases 2023 State Policy Program “Respect and Dignity” https://proactnow.org/leading-immigrant-advocacy-group-releases-2023-state-policy-program-respect-and-dignity/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 03:09:05 +0000 https://proactnow.org/leading-immigrant-advocacy-group-releases-2023-state-policy-program-respect-and-dignity/

A Make the Road rally (photo: Make the Road NY)


Make the Road New York, the state’s largest member organization of immigrant advocates, will release its 2023-24 state policy platform on Wednesday and launch a series of town halls to push for legislation that includes protections expanded against unemployment, better access to health care, instituting expulsion for “good cause”, ending racially-based school discipline, decriminalizing sex work, raising taxes on the wealthy, etc

With 25,000 members statewide, Make the Road New York (MRNY) represents a major progressive group in the state that has consistently lobbied for immigrant and worker-friendly legislation. The group is set to launch its “Respect and Dignity” policy platform at its office in Jackson Heights, Queens on Wednesday afternoon, followed by a town hall in the evening. The group also has town halls planned in Brooklyn and Westchester, and aims to hold one on Long Island as well.

Albany’s new agenda includes a series of legislative and budget demands that the group and its allies hope Democratic Gov. Kathy Hochul will heed, hot off the heels of her narrow victory in the general election where progressives take credit for the helping to fulfill her first full term. in the office. As she heads into the new year working with a Democratic-dominated state legislature, Hochul will also deliver her second state of the state address and executive budget, outlining her own priorities and setting the table. for the six-month state legislative session.

“It was people of color, especially black voters, and people of color in New York City who really got Kathy Hochul re-elected,” MRNY co-executive director Jose Lopez said in a phone interview. “And I think what our communities will be looking for given the outcome of this election and the fact that we protected his seat is a movement on substantive issues that really impacts working class and working class communities. ‘colored immigrants.’

Like the state’s $2.1 billion Disqualified Workers Fund, which provided assistance to those who were unable to receive federal unemployment benefits during the pandemic, MRNY is pushing for the passage of a bill, sponsored by State Senator Jessica Ramos and Assemblywoman Karines Reyes that would create a permanent unemployment insurance program for “excluded” workers. At a cost of $800 million per year, the bill would establish the first-ever excluded worker unemployment program to give up to $1,200 per month in support to up to 50,000 ineligible unemployed workers, including freelancers and gig economy workers.

A new fund would be crucial for people like Gerardo Vital, father of two and member of Make the Road New York. “Immigrants like me, we contribute and help the economy…we contribute like everyone else, but at the end of the day we don’t get any help when we lose our jobs with any type of unemployment,” said he said in a telephone interview, through an interpreter. .

Vital is currently unemployed and fears falling behind on rent and car insurance payments. “But there’s no program I can apply for that I can get any help,” he said. “People think we don’t matter but we do because we contribute to the state, we pay our taxes.”

The MRNY is also advocating for the passage of a health care coverage bill sponsored by State Senator Gustavo Rivera and outgoing Assemblyman Richard Gottfried to create a critical plan funded by the state to provide health care to all low-income New Yorkers, regardless of immigration status. The group estimates that about 154,000 state residents are currently ineligible for federal health insurance programs such as Medicaid and Essential Plan due to their immigration status, and that the program would cost about $345 million. per year and would involve the participation of at least 46,000 people. (With Gottfried’s departure from the Assembly, the Bill will have to be reintroduced by another MP in the next legislative session.)

As Hochul enters his first term, high on his agenda is housing affordability and access, a priority MRNY advocates also share. The group’s agenda is pushing for the passage of a ‘good cause’ eviction, sponsored by State Senator Julia Salazar and Assemblywoman Pamela Hunter, which would provide tenants with crucial protections from eviction. eviction, in particular against the significant annual increases in rents. The bill has gained momentum in the Legislative Assembly in recent years, but has yet to pass and Hochul did not say whether she supports it.

The MRNY is also urging the state to create a $200 million housing voucher program, half of which is earmarked for households at risk of homelessness and the other half for homeless individuals and families. The program, championed by State Senator Brian Kavanagh and Assemblyman Steven Cymbrowitz, got a lot of momentum in the Legislature last year, but the Hochul administration disputed the cost estimate. and refused to support her.

“These are things that New Yorkers care about, these are things that New Yorkers want to see happen,” Lopez said. “And those will be the fights we help fight with allies across the state to make sure this administration delivers on its promises.”

Another proposal on the agenda includes the Solutions Not Suspensions Act, sponsored by State Senator Robert Jackson and retiring Assemblywoman Cathy Nolan. As with Gottfried’s bill, the legislation will need to be passed by another member next year. It aims to end harsh school disciplinary practices that disproportionately affect students of color and people with disabilities. This would limit the use of suspensions and instead focus on restorative practices.

Make the Road also supports the Stop Violence in the Sex Trades Act, sponsored by Salazar, which would decriminalize sex work for consenting adults and expunge records of arrests, convictions and incarcerations for sex work that do not is more criminal.

Although some of these legislative proposals will require significant state funding, Lopez said they “are not very onerous” and could easily be offset by the Invest in our New York package of bills, which aims to generate up to $50 billion in revenue by closing tax loopholes and raising taxes on the wealthy, corporations and Wall Street. This argument is likely to meet resistance, especially from Governor Hochul, who has repeatedly said she has no plans to raise taxes.

“We’re going to be prepared for those arguments when they come,” Lopez said. “But I think the reality is that we view budgets as moral documents and there will be a question, particularly after the election, about where we spend.”

“Our hope is that [Governor Hochul] learns some lessons from this election and that it understands that to perform better, it is going to have to ensure progressive good faith, especially next year,” he added.

Make the Road has several other priorities for the state government to pursue, including adequate budget allocations for the state’s new public campaign finance program, with a request for $70 million for the next budget, due by April 1; increase subsidies and eliminate bureaucratic barriers to child care for low-income families, regardless of employment or immigration status; ensuring that Hochul honors its commitment to fully fund the Foundation’s aid to public schools; investing $18.6 million in adult literacy; restoring $5.2 million in funding for the Community Health Advocates Program; increase funding for the Navigators program that helps people enroll in health insurance; updating the New York Hospital Financial Assistance Act; and passing the Access to Representation Act to provide universal legal representation to New Yorkers facing deportation.

]]> Judges clapped at conservative group’s anniversary dinner | app https://proactnow.org/judges-clapped-at-conservative-groups-anniversary-dinner-app/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 15:13:32 +0000 https://proactnow.org/judges-clapped-at-conservative-groups-anniversary-dinner-app/

WASHINGTON (AP) — Four of the five Supreme Court justices who struck down the constitutional right to abortion showed up at the conservative Federalist Society’s black-tie dinner marking its 40th anniversary.

Judge Samuel Alito received a long, loud ovation Thursday night from a crowd of 2,000, most in tuxedos and robes, when another speaker praised his opinion in June that overturned Roe v. Wade, long a target of judicial conservatives.

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Lobby group calls for boycott of The Crown ahead of premiere https://proactnow.org/lobby-group-calls-for-boycott-of-the-crown-ahead-of-premiere/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 02:34:28 +0000 https://proactnow.org/lobby-group-calls-for-boycott-of-the-crown-ahead-of-premiere/

Hours before the long-awaited premiere of the Netflix blockbuster’s final season The crown finally falls, the Australian Monarchist League has issued a stern call to boycott it and the streaming giant due to “inaccuracies”.

fans of The crown have waited nearly two years for season five, which will focus on Queen Elizabeth’s reign throughout the 1990s – a troubled period of growing unpopularity, the breakdown of royal marriages and the devastating fire at Windsor Castle .

It was a difficult time – the late Queen even described 1992 as her “annus horribilis” (Latin for “horrible year”).

Correct the recording

With the new series releasing in Australia later on Wednesday, the AML has also been in the spotlight, with a stark statement.

The AML is a voluntary pressure group whose campaign committee is headed by former federal government minister Eric Abetz. It is dedicated to the maintenance of the British monarch as the head of the Australian state.

“Lies and inaccuracies, especially about His Majesty the King…broadcast…will lead monarchists and sensible people to withdraw their support for the programme. [sic] and Netflix as a whole if the platform does not act to correct the record,” Chairman Philip Benwell warned.

“It’s one thing to create a clearly fictionalized narrative such as Robin Hood, but it’s quite another to deliberately construct a series that includes lies and inaccuracies about people who are still living.”

“So we have launched a protest and if Netflix does not issue a definitive disclaimer we will launch a campaign asking the monarchists to end all association with Netflix,” he told his followers via email. mail.

It is unclear whether the AML actually saw any of the The crownthe latest episodes of – although the upcoming series has been marred by controversy.

Britain’s Royal Publisher Mirror newspaper, Russell Myers, has already binge-watched the series. He described it as “uncomfortable viewing”, especially as the new king is riding a “wave of popularity” in Britain.

However, he said the new season “brings The crown to life” and offered a deeper understanding of how the royal family was perceived during that decade.

“It’s like today, everything we know about the royal family, especially the relationship between [then] Prince Charles and Diana.

“It’s absolutely explosive, [Australian actress] Elizabeth Debicki is masterful in her interpretation [of Diana].

“There’s drama, intrigue, deception,” he told Nine’s extra today.

Ahead of the first episode at 5 p.m. Wednesday (AEDT), the cast “dazzled” at the red carpet world premiere in London.

Fact or fiction – either way it’s ‘toe curling’ stuff

The AML remains very concerned by widespread reports that the new series features “a totally false conversation between the then Prince of Wales (now King) and then Prime Minister Sir John Major about the abdication of the queen, arouses great concern”.

“Even before Sir John issued a statement saying that this fictitious conversation was ‘a bunch of malevolent nonsense’, it is fundamentally clear that Prince Charles would never have spoken about the Queen’s abdication,” he said. -he declares.

“He, more than anyone, knew that because of the oath Her Majesty had taken at her coronation, she would never abdicate, because the pledge she had made was for life.

The crownis Charles and Diana in happier times. Picture: Netflix

The whispered scene also drew fire from actor Judi Dench, who wrote to The temperature complaining about the “gross sensationalism” of Netflix. This prompted Netflix to finally relent and agree to add a disclaimer, warning viewers that the show is a “fictional drama based on real events”.

The disclaimer appears below the YouTube trailer for the fifth series and on Netflix’s title synopsis page.

Netflix told BBC News The crown “has always been presented as a drama based on historical events”.

Either way, Australia’s monarchists have accused Netflix of being “negligent in their duty to the public by failing to provide any kind of specifics about these ‘real life events’.”

“Masses of people” would leave Netflix unless the record is corrected, AML said.

Diana
Australian Elizabeth Debicki will be seen as Princess Diana for the first time in the new series. Picture: Netflix

By contrast, according to Myers, series five offers — overall — “a vision” of how the royal family was perceived in the 1990s.

“The Queen had a hard time in the 1990s. She had the breakdown of her children’s relationships, and that even before Diana’s death, which will be dealt with in series six,” he said.

“The Queen had to come from a position of fighting for her reputation and the reputation of the monarchy.

Myers said The crown was ‘a fictionalized series’ – and that, when approached, Buckingham Palace said it did not comment on fiction.

“The storylines that unfold are absolutely great…but don’t let everything fool you,” he said.

“It’s really uncomfortable viewing…we’re learning [then Prince Charles’] affair with Camilla, we learn of the unfortunate Tampongate.

“It really is a hair curler at times, and the brutality of the relationship with Diana is quite fresh in memory.

“Whether it’s fact or fiction, it’s definitely going to be uncomfortable viewing and uncomfortable headlines,” he said.

Myers feels the show is a “great window into the world and the madness” of the time.

]]>
The Russian Wagner Group opens a defense technology center in Saint Petersburg | Russia https://proactnow.org/the-russian-wagner-group-opens-a-defense-technology-center-in-saint-petersburg-russia/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 21:11:00 +0000 https://proactnow.org/the-russian-wagner-group-opens-a-defense-technology-center-in-saint-petersburg-russia/

Russia’s Wagner Group – the once-secret private militia controlled by Yevgeny Prigozhin – has opened a military technology center in St Petersburg, in the latest move by Putin’s ally who has criticized senior Kremlin defense brass over the Ukrainian conflict.

The opening of the “Wagner Center” on Friday is seen as another step by Prigozhin to publicize his military credentials and play a more public role in shaping Russia’s defense policy.

He is taking several steps to boost his public profile in recent weeks, unlike the years the businessman has spent operating in the shadows and denying he was behind Wagner, whose contract soldiers support the military Russian in Ukraine.

The opening of the large steel and glass office building brought together a mix of veterans in military uniforms and young tech and cultural professionals, and saw lectures by nationalist and pro-Kremlin figures saying that the center would help “make our great country even better”. .

A truck was parked outside emblazoned with the Z symbol used by Russian forces in Ukraine.

Inside the Wagner Center in Saint Petersburg. Photograph: Igor Russak/Reuters

“We invite startups involved in IT, industrial technology and those who develop new ideas that they are ready to apply in the field of national defense,” said Anastasia Vasilevskaya, press secretary of the center, where several drones were on display.

“We are of course interested in projects that can serve as import substitution,” she said. Sanctions imposed by Western countries have made it more difficult for Russia to purchase foreign weapons technology.

Prigozhin has made a series of outspoken interventions about Russia’s setbacks during what he calls the special military operation in Ukraine, joining Chechen leader Ramzan Kadyrov in ridiculing the performance of Russian generals.

Prigozhin, nicknamed “Putin’s chef” because his catering business hosted dinner parties attended by the Russian president, first publicly confirmed in September that he was Wagner’s founder.

Wagner was established in 2014 to support pro-Russian separatists in eastern Ukraine, but after years shrouded in secrecy he has taken an increasingly public role in Russia’s foreign policy and the invasion of Ukraine.

Prighozin has made a series of visits to Russia’s vast prison system, seeking to draft prisoners in a bid to make up for the country’s personnel shortages on the battlefield in Ukraine.

Wagner has been accused of committing human rights abuses in Ukraine, Syria, Libya, Central African Republic, Sudan and Mozambique. The group’s alleged co-founder, Dmitry Utkin, has been linked to the far right and is said to have named the group after Hitler’s favorite composer. The United States and the EU imposed sanctions on Prigozhin and Utkin for their role in Wagner.

There was no sign at the opening of Prigozhin itself.

“The creation of such a center has been a long time in coming. The only thing was that he appeared very late,” said volunteer Alexey Savinsky, dressed in military camouflage. “This center was to be opened a year before the special military operation. So that’s two years late.

]]>
SELECTIVE INSURANCE GROUP INC – 10-Q – MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS ON FINANCIAL POSITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS. https://proactnow.org/selective-insurance-group-inc-10-q-managements-discussion-and-analysis-on-financial-position-and-results-of-operations/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 18:31:56 +0000 https://proactnow.org/selective-insurance-group-inc-10-q-managements-discussion-and-analysis-on-financial-position-and-results-of-operations/
Forward-Looking Statements
The terms "Company," "we," "us," and "our" refer to Selective Insurance Group,
Inc. (the "Parent"), and its subsidiaries, except as expressly indicated or the
context otherwise requires. Certain statements in this Quarterly Report on Form
10-Q, including information incorporated by reference, are "forward-looking
statements" as defined by the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995
("PSLRA"). The PSLRA provides a safe harbor under the Securities Act of 1933 and
the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 for forward-looking statements. These
statements relate to our intentions, beliefs, projections, estimations, or
forecasts of future events and financial performance. They involve known and
unknown risks, uncertainties, and other factors that may cause our or industry
actual results, activity levels, or performance to materially differ from those
expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements. In some cases,
forward-looking statements include the words "may," "will," "could," "would,"
"should," "expect," "plan," "anticipate," "target," "project," "intend,"
"believe," "estimate," "predict," "potential," "pro forma," "seek," "likely,"
"continue," or comparable terms. Our forward-looking statements are only
predictions, and we can give no assurance that such expectations will prove
correct. We undertake no obligation, other than as federal securities laws may
require, to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements for any
reason.

Factors that could cause our actual results to differ materially from what we
project, forecast, or estimate in forward-looking statements are discussed in
further detail in Item 1A. "Risk Factors." in Part II. "Other Information" of
this Form 10-Q. These risk factors may not be exhaustive. We operate in a
constantly changing business environment, and new risk factors may emerge
anytime. We can neither predict these new risk factors nor assess their impact,
if any, on our businesses or the extent any factor or combination of factors may
cause actual results to differ materially from any forward-looking statements.
Given these risks, uncertainties, and assumptions, the forward-looking events we
discuss in this report might not occur.

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Introduction
We classify our business into four reportable segments:

•Standard Commercial Lines;
•Standard Personal Lines;
•Excess and Surplus Lines ("E&S Lines"); and
•Investments.

For more details about these segments, refer to Note 9. "Segment Information" in
Item 1. "Financial Statements." of this Form 10-Q and Note 12. "Segment
Information" in Item 8. "Financial Statements and Supplementary Data." of our
Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2021 ("2021 Annual
Report").

We write our Standard Commercial and Standard Personal Lines products and
services through nine of our insurance subsidiaries, some of which participate
in the federal government's National Flood Insurance Program's ("NFIP") Write
Your Own Program. We write our E&S products through another subsidiary, Mesa
Underwriters Specialty Insurance Company, a nationally-authorized non-admitted
platform for customers who generally cannot obtain coverage in the standard
marketplace. Collectively, we refer to our ten insurance subsidiaries as the
"Insurance Subsidiaries."

The following is Management's Discussion and Analysis ("MD&A") of the
consolidated results of operations and financial condition, as well as known
trends and uncertainties, that may have a material impact in future periods.
Investors should read the MD&A in conjunction with Item 1. "Financial
Statements." of this Form 10-Q and the consolidated financial statements in our
2021 Annual Report filed with the United States ("U.S.") Securities and Exchange
Commission.

In the MD&A, we will discuss and analyze the following:

•Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates;
•Financial Highlights of Results for the third quarters ended September 30, 2022
("Third Quarter 2022") and September 30, 2021 ("Third Quarter 2021"); and the
nine-month periods ended September 30, 2022 ("Nine Months 2022") and
September 30, 2021 ("Nine Months 2021");
•Results of Operations and Related Information by Segment;
•Federal Income Taxes;
•Liquidity and Capital Resources; and
•Ratings.

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates
Our unaudited interim consolidated financial statements include amounts for
which we have made informed estimates and judgments for transactions not yet
completed. Such estimates and judgments affect the reported amounts in the
consolidated financial statements. As outlined in our 2021 Annual Report, those
estimates and judgments most critical to the preparation of the consolidated
financial statements involved the following: (i) reserves for loss and loss
expense; (ii) investment valuation and the allowance for credit losses on
available-for-sale ("AFS") fixed income securities; and (iii) reinsurance. These
estimates and judgments require the use of assumptions about highly uncertain
matters, making them subject to change as facts and circumstances develop. If
different estimates and judgments had been applied, materially different amounts
might have been reported in the financial statements. For additional information
regarding our critical accounting policies and estimates, refer to pages 35
through 43 of our 2021 Annual Report.

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Financial Highlights of Results for Third Quarter and Nine Months 2022 and Third
Quarter and Nine Months 20211

                                                                        Quarter ended September 30,               Change                      Nine Months ended September 30,               Change
($ and shares in thousands, except per share amounts)                     2022                 2021            % or Points                       2022                   2021             % or Points
Financial Data:
Revenues                                                             $   895,020             865,044                 3       %             $   2,605,900             2,509,469                 4       %
After-tax net investment income                                           51,533              74,690               (31)                          166,706               198,474               (16)
After-tax underwriting income                                             21,434               8,642               148                            95,333               129,984               (27)
Net income before federal income tax                                      52,639              92,636               (43)                          172,433               381,466               (55)
Net income                                                                42,525              73,705               (42)                          138,375               304,858               (55)
Net income available to common stockholders                               40,225              71,405               (44)                          131,475               297,805               (56)

Key Metrics:
Combined ratio                                                              96.8    %           98.6              (1.8)      pts                    95.2         %        92.6               2.6       pts
Invested assets per dollar of common stockholders' equity            $      3.38                2.89                17       %             $        3.38                  2.89                17       %
Return on common equity ("ROE")                                              7.0                10.6              (3.6)      pts                     7.0                  15.1              (8.1)      pts
Net premiums written ("NPW") to statutory surplus ratio                     1.45    x           1.35              0.10                              1.45    x             1.35              0.10

Per Common Share Amounts:
Diluted net income per share                                         $      0.66                1.18               (44)      %             $        2.16                  4.92               (56)      %
Book value per share                                                       36.96               45.27               (18)                            36.96                 45.27               (18)
Dividends declared per share to common stockholders                         0.28                0.25                12                              0.84                  0.75                12

Non-GAAP Information:
Non-GAAP operating income2                                           $    60,514              71,265               (15)      %             $     217,517               285,676               (24)      %
Non-GAAP operating income per diluted common share2                         0.99                1.18               (16)                             3.57                  4.72               (24)
Non-GAAP operating ROE2                                                     10.5    %           10.6              (0.1)      pts                    11.6         %        14.5              (2.9)      pts
Adjusted book value per common share2                                $     44.59               41.56                 7       %             $       44.59                 41.56                 7       %


1Refer to the Glossary of Terms attached to our 2021 Annual Report as Exhibit
99.1 for definitions of terms used of this Form 10-Q.
2Non-GAAP operating income, non-GAAP operating income per diluted common share,
and non-GAAP operating ROE are measures comparable to net income available to
common stockholders, net income available to common stockholders per diluted
common share, and ROE, respectively, but exclude after-tax net realized and
unrealized gains and losses on investments included in net income. Adjusted book
value per common share is a measure comparable to book value per common share,
but excludes total after-tax unrealized gains and losses on investments included
in accumulated other comprehensive (loss) income. These non-GAAP measures are
important financial measures used by us, analysts, and investors because the
timing of realized and unrealized investment gains and losses on securities in
any given period is largely discretionary. In addition, net realized and
unrealized investment gains and losses on investments could distort the analysis
of trends.

Reconciliations of net income available to common stockholders, net income
available to common stockholders per diluted common share, ROE, and book value
per common share to non-GAAP operating income, non-GAAP operating income per
diluted common share, non-GAAP operating ROE, and adjusted book value per common
share, respectively, are provided in the tables below:

Reconciliation of net income available to common               Quarter ended September 30,           Nine Months ended September 30,
stockholders to non-GAAP operating income
($ in thousands)                                                 2022                2021                2022                 2021
Net income available to common stockholders                 $    40,225             71,405          $    131,475            297,805

Net realized and unrealized investment losses (gains)
included in net income, before tax

                               25,681               (177)              108,913            (15,353)

Tax on reconciling items                                         (5,392)                37               (22,871)             3,224
Non-GAAP operating income                                   $    60,514             71,265          $    217,517            285,676



Reconciliation of net income available to common               Quarter ended September 30,             Nine Months ended September 30,
stockholders per diluted common share to non-GAAP
operating income per diluted common share
                                                                  2022                2021                 2022                  2021
Net income available to common stockholders per
diluted common share                                        $        0.66              1.18          $         2.16               4.92

Net realized and unrealized investment losses (gains)
included in net income, before tax

                                   0.42                 -                    1.79              (0.25)

Tax on reconciling items                                            (0.09)                -                   (0.38)              0.05

Non-GAAP operating earnings per diluted common share $0.99

           1.18          $         3.57               4.72



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Reconciliation of ROE to non-GAAP operating ROE                Quarter ended September 30,            Nine Months ended September 30,
                                                                  2022                2021                 2022                2021
ROE                                                                   7.0  %           10.6                    7.0  %           15.1

Net realized and unrealized investment losses (gains)
included in net income, before tax

                                    4.4                 -                    5.8              (0.8)

Tax on reconciling items                                             (0.9)                -                   (1.2)              0.2
Non-GAAP operating ROE                                               10.5  %           10.6                   11.6  %           14.5



Reconciliation of book value per common share to               Quarter ended September 30,           Nine Months ended September 30,

adjusted book value per common share

                                                                 2022                2021                 2022                2021
Book value per common share                                 $      36.96             45.27          $       36.96             45.27

Total unrealized investment losses (gains) included
in accumulated other comprehensive income,
before tax

                                                          9.67             (4.71)                  9.67             (4.71)
Tax on reconciling items                                           (2.04)             1.00                  (2.04)             1.00
Adjusted book value per common share                        $      44.59             41.56          $       44.59             41.56



The components of our ROE and non-GAAP operating ROE are as follows:

ROE and non-GAAP operating ROE
Components                                          Quarter ended September 30,                                       Nine Months ended September 30,
                                                  2022                      2021              Change Points               2022                 2021              Change Points
Standard Commercial Lines Segment                  3.1      %                2.1                   1.0                        4.7    %            6.2                (1.5)
Standard Personal Lines Segment                   (0.2)                     (1.3)                  1.1                       (0.3)                0.1                (0.4)
E&S Lines Segment                                  0.8                       0.5                   0.3                        0.7                 0.3                 0.4
Total insurance operations                         3.7                       1.3                   2.4                        5.1                 6.6                (1.5)

Investment income                                  8.9                      11.0                  (2.1)                       8.9                10.1  %             (1.2)
Net realized and unrealized investment
(losses) gains                                    (3.5)                        -                  (3.5)                      (4.6)                0.6                (5.2)
Total investments segment                          5.4                      11.0                  (5.6)                       4.3                10.7                (6.4)

Other                                             (2.1)                     (1.7)                 (0.4)                      (2.4)               (2.2)               (0.2)

ROE                                                7.0                      10.6                  (3.6)                       7.0                15.1                (8.1)
Net realized and unrealized investment
losses (gains), after tax                          3.5                         -                   3.5                        4.6                (0.6)                5.2
Non-GAAP Operating ROE                            10.5                      10.6                  (0.1)                      11.6                14.5                (2.9)


Our non-GAAP operating ROE of 11.6% for the nine months of 2022 was higher than our full year
2022 targets non-GAAP operating ROE of 11%, but lower than our nine-month 2021
Non-GAAP operational ROE of 14.5%.

The decrease in Nine Months 2022 compared to Nine Months 2021 was primarily
driven by a reduction in after-tax underwriting and investment income. After-tax
underwriting income decreased $34.7 million, or 1.5 ROE points, in Nine Months
2022 compared to Nine Months 2021, primarily from increased non-catastrophe
property loss and loss expenses and lower favorable prior year casualty reserve
development, offset partially by a decrease in net catastrophe losses. The
higher non-catastrophe property loss and loss expenses were mainly due to the
higher inflationary environment.

After-tax investment income declined $31.8 millioni.e. 1.2 points of ROE, in Nine
Month 2022 over nine months 2021, from lower after-tax alternative
investment income over nine months of 2022.

In addition, our ROE was reduced by the impact of net realized and unrealized
investment gains and losses, which was 5.2 ROE points in Nine Months 2022. Net
realized and unrealized investment losses in both current-year periods compared
to net realized and unrealized investment gains in the same prior-year periods
drove the reduction in our ROE. The increase in net realized and unrealized
losses resulted from (i) a decrease in valuations reflecting the current public
equities market, (ii) active trading of our fixed income securities to increase
the book yield of our fixed income portfolio due to increasing new money rates,
resulting in realized losses, and (iii) higher credit loss expense on our AFS
fixed income securities portfolio.

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Outlook
We entered 2022 in the strongest financial position in our 95-year history, with
a record level of GAAP equity, statutory capital and surplus, and holding
company cash and investments. We are well positioned to continue executing on
our strategic objectives and delivering growth and profitability. Although not
as favorable as Nine Months 2021, our overall Nine Months 2022 financial results
were strong, with 11% growth in NPW and a 11.6% non-GAAP operating ROE, which
was above our full-year target of 11%.

In 2022, the elevated level of economic inflation, the significant increase in
interest rates, and predictions of a recession in the near term, which have led
to a widening of credit spreads, have all contributed to lower investment
valuations and significant financial market volatility. The higher interest
rates and widening of credit spreads, with interest rates having the most
significant impact, have reduced the fair value of our fixed income securities,
which in turn has negatively impacted our stockholders' equity, which was down
19% during Nine Months 2022. The higher economic inflation has also negatively
impacted our property loss and loss expenses through increased severities in our
short-tail property lines, which has reduced our underwriting income. Should
these trends continue, and in the absence of taking rate and other underwriting
actions, our underwriting profitability could be negatively impacted in the near
term. We will continue to focus on underwriting improvements and achieving
written renewal pure price increases that meet or exceed expected loss trend. In
Third Quarter 2022, we achieved Standard Commercial Lines renewal pure price
increases of 5.8% and exposure growth of 3.8%, resulting in total renewal
premium growth of 9.6%. These rates were up sequentially from the second quarter
of 2022, which experienced renewal pure price increases of 5.3% and exposure
growth of 3.9%, resulting in total renewal premium growth of 9.2%.

While higher interest rates, wider credit spreads, and financial market
volatility have negatively impacted our investment valuations and certain key
financial metrics, such as stockholders' equity and book value per common share,
they have also provided us with the opportunity to invest our cash flows at
significantly higher new money rates. Our pre-tax new money purchase rates for
fixed income securities averaged 4.2% in Nine Months 2022, compared to 2.2% for
Nine Months 2021. The pre-tax new money purchase rates for fixed income
securities increased to 5.1% in Third Quarter 2022, which was above our Third
Quarter 2022 average pre-tax fixed income investment yield of 4.2%. The
portfolio's net investment income also benefits from our 14% allocation to
floating rate fixed income securities, which are primarily tied to 90-day LIBOR,
which increased from 0.21% at December 31, 2021, to 3.75% at September 30, 2022.
These floating securities have reset quarterly at higher rates, which combined
with our higher new money purchase rates for fixed income securities, is
contributing to higher net investment income from our fixed income securities.
Partially offsetting the increase in net investment income from fixed income
securities, are lower returns from our allocation to alternative investments.
These assumptions are factored into our full-year after-tax net investment
income expectations, as discussed below.

We continue to focus on several other fundamental areas to position ourselves
continued success:

•Delivering on our strategy for continued disciplined and profitable growth by:
•Continuing to expand our Standard Commercial Lines market share by (i)
increasing our share towards our 12% target of our agents' premiums, (ii)
strategically appointing new agents, and (iii) maximizing new business growth in
the small business market through utilization of our enhanced small business
platform;
•Expanding our geographic footprint. In June 2022, we began writing Standard
Commercial Lines business in Vermont. In October 2022, we began writing Standard
Commercial Lines business in Alabama and Idaho. We plan to expand our Standard
Commercial Lines footprint into other states over time;
•Increasing customer retention by delivering a superior omnichannel experience
and offering value-added technologies and services;
•Shifting our Standard Personal Lines products and services towards customers in
the mass affluent market, where we believe we can be more competitive with the
strong coverage and servicing capabilities that we offer; and
•Deploying our new underwriting platform in our E&S segment and improving
agents' ease of interactions with us.

•Continuing to build on a culture centered on the values of diversity, equity,
and inclusion that fosters innovation, idea generation, and developing a group
of specially trained leaders who can guide us successfully into the future.

Our expectations for the full year are as follows:

•A GAAP combined ratio, excluding net catastrophe losses, of 91.5% (prior
guidance was 90.5%). Our combined ratio estimate assumes no additional prior
year casualty reserve development;
•Net catastrophe losses of 3.5 points (prior guidance 4.0 points) on the
combined ratio;
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•After-tax net investment income of $215 million (prior guidance was $215
million) that includes after-tax net investment income from our alternative
investments of $7 million (prior guidance was $15 million);
•An overall effective tax rate of approximately 20.5%, which assumes an
effective tax rate of 19.5% for net investment income and 21.0% for all other
items; and
•Weighted average shares of 61 million on a fully diluted basis, which assumes
no additional share repurchases we may make under our authorization.

As we look ahead to 2023, we believe the elevated level of economic inflation
will persist and continue to negatively impact our short-tail property lines of
business and may impact our general and administrative expenses. In addition, we
expect reduced reinsurance capacity and higher demand for new and expanded
reinsurance purchases by U.S. primary companies will likely result in higher
reinsurance prices in 2023 and less favorable terms and conditions for the
industry. These factors could negatively impact our 2023 combined ratio and
underwriting profits, although we are well-positioned to navigate these
challenges and expect to continue generating strong overall returns.

Results of operations and related information by segment

Insurance Operations
The following table provides quantitative information for analyzing the combined
ratio:

All Lines                             Quarter ended September 30,                                                     Nine Months ended September 30,
($ in thousands)                        2022                2021             Change % or Points                       2022                        2021             Change % or Points
Insurance Operations
Results:
Net premiums written ("NPW")       $   903,394             812,906                    11         %              $   2,723,933                  2,444,289                    11         %
Net premiums earned ("NPE")            853,879             767,247                    11                            2,500,601                  2,232,725                    12
Less:
Loss and loss expense
incurred                               547,826             505,269                     8                            1,566,930                  1,340,293                    17
Net underwriting expenses
incurred                               277,988             250,033                    11                              809,455                    724,484                    12
Dividends to policyholders                 933               1,006                    (7)                               3,542                      3,411                     4
Underwriting income                $    27,132              10,939                   148         %              $     120,674                    164,537                   (27)        %
Combined Ratios:
Loss and loss expense ratio               64.1    %           65.9                  (1.8)        pts                     62.7    %                  60.0                   2.7         pts
Underwriting expense ratio                32.6                32.6                     -                                 32.4                       32.4                     -
Dividends to policyholders
ratio                                      0.1                 0.1                     -                                  0.1                        0.2                  (0.1)
Combined ratio                            96.8                98.6                  (1.8)                                95.2                       92.6                   2.6



The NPW growth of 11% in Third Quarter and Nine Months 2022 compared to the same
prior-year periods reflected (i) overall renewal pure price increases, and (ii)
higher direct new business, as shown in the following table:

                                                 Quarter ended September 30,                             Nine Months ended September 30,
($ in millions)                                   2022                  2021                   2022                     2021
Direct new business premiums                $     184.3                  168.3                       $     543.5                    497.3
Renewal pure price increases on NPW                 5.3     %              4.9                               5.0     %                5.1



Our NPW growth in Third Quarter and Nine Months 2022 benefited from strong
retention. In addition, increased economic activity and inflation in the U.S.
resulted in our customers increasing their sales, payrolls, and exposure units,
all of which favorably impacted our NPW.

The increase in NPEs in the third quarter and nine months of 2022 compared to the same
prior year periods resulted from the same impacts on NPW described above.

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Loss and Loss Expenses
The loss and loss expense ratio decreased 1.8 points in Third Quarter 2022 and
increased 2.7 points in Nine Months 2022 compared to the same prior-year
periods, primarily due to the following:

                                                        Third Quarter 2022                                Third Quarter 2021
                                                                                                Loss and
                                           Loss and Loss            Impact on                     Loss               Impact on
                                              Expense             Loss and Loss                 Expense            Loss and Loss
($ in millions)                               Incurred            Expense Ratio                 Incurred           Expense Ratio                Change in Ratio
Net catastrophe losses                     $      34.1                   4.0      pts         $    76.3                  10.0      pts               (6.0)       pts
(Favorable) prior year casualty
reserve development                              (16.0)                 (1.9)                     (14.0)                 (1.8)                      

(0.1)

Non-catastrophe property loss and
loss expenses                                    167.5                  19.6                      123.7                  16.1                         3.5
Total                                      $     185.6                  21.7                  $   186.0                  24.3                        (2.6)

                                                         Nine Months 2022                                  Nine Months 2021
                                                                                                Loss and
                                           Loss and Loss            Impact on                     Loss               Impact on
                                              Expense             Loss and Loss                 Expense            Loss and Loss
($ in millions)                               Incurred            Expense Ratio                 Incurred           Expense Ratio                Change in Ratio
Net catastrophe losses                     $     100.2                   4.0      pts         $   128.9                   5.8      pts               (1.8)       pts
(Favorable) prior year casualty
reserve development                              (48.0)                 (1.9)                     (66.0)                 (3.0)                      

1.1

Non-catastrophe property loss and
loss expenses                                    456.4                  18.3                      346.6                  15.5                         2.8
Total                                      $     508.6                  20.4                  $   409.5                  18.3                         2.1



Net catastrophe losses in Third Quarter and Nine Months 2022 included $10.0
million, or 1.2 points in Third Quarter 2022, and 0.4 points in Nine Months
2022, of net losses from Hurricane Ian, which affected the Southeastern states
of our footprint. These losses were partially offset by $1.9 million, or 0.2
points in Third Quarter 2022 and 0.1 points in Nine Months 2022, of flood claims
handling fees.

We had less losses from Hurricane Ian in Third Quarter and Nine Months 2022 than
Hurricane Ida in Third Quarter and Nine Months 2021. Net catastrophe losses from
Hurricane Ida contributed 5.6 percentage points in Third Quarter 2021 and 1.9
percentage points in Nine Months 2021. Losses from Hurricane Ida were primarily
attributable to property losses, including personal and commercial automobiles,
in New Jersey and the surrounding states. Accordingly, we experienced lower net
catastrophe losses in Third Quarter and Nine Months 2022 compared to the same
prior-year periods.

Also negatively impacting our loss and loss expense ratio was the recognition of
$9.3 million of ceded earned casualty reinstatement premium on the second layer
of our Casualty Excess of Loss Treaty ("Casualty Treaty"), which increased the
ratio by 0.8 points in Third Quarter 2022 and 0.3 points in Nine Months 2022,
compared to the same prior-year periods. The recognition of this reinstatement
premium was principally due to development on one large loss from the 2018
treaty year and two large losses from the 2020 treaty year. Despite the
development on this casualty treaty layer, our prior year loss development, on a
net basis, remains favorable as reflected in the table below:

(Favorable)/Unfavorable Prior Year Casualty Reserve
Development                                                Quarter ended September 30,                 Nine Months ended September 30,
($ in millions)                                          2022                        2021                  2022                 2021
General liability                                   $          -                       (4.0)         $        (5.0)              (29.0)
Commercial automobile                                       15.0                          -                   15.0                   -
Workers compensation                                       (20.0)                      (8.0)                 (40.0)              (28.0)
Businessowners' policies                                    (8.0)                      (2.0)                  (8.0)               (2.0)
Bonds                                                       (3.0)                         -                  (10.0)                  -
  Total Standard Commercial Lines                          (16.0)                     (14.0)                 (48.0)              (59.0)

Homeowners                                                     -                          -                      -                   -
Personal automobile                                            -                          -                      -                   -
  Total Standard Personal Lines                                -                          -                      -                   -

E&S                                                            -                          -                      -                (7.0)

Total (favorable) prior year casualty reserve
development                                         $      (16.0)                     (14.0)         $       (48.0)              (66.0)

(Favorable) impact on loss ratio                            (1.9)   pts                (1.8)                  (1.9)               (3.0)



For additional qualitative discussion on reserve development and non-catastrophe
property loss and loss expenses, refer to the insurance segment sections below
in "Results of Operations and Related Information by Segment."
                                       30
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Standard Commercial Lines Segment

                                            Quarter ended September 30,             Change                       Nine Months ended September 30,               Change
                                                                                     % or                                                                       % or
($ in thousands)                              2022                2021              Points                       2022                        2021              Points
Insurance Segments Results:
NPW                                      $   727,463             652,603              11     %             $   2,225,395                  1,995,297              12     %
NPE                                          692,437             619,571              12                       2,034,143                  1,808,466              12
Less:
Loss and loss expense incurred               438,264             393,503              11                       1,244,639                  1,048,170     

19

Net underwriting expenses incurred           230,739             207,649              11                         674,369                    602,035              12
Dividends to policyholders                       933               1,006              (7)                          3,542                      3,411               4
Underwriting income                           22,501              17,413              29                   $     111,593                    154,850             (28)
Combined Ratios:
Loss and loss expense ratio                     63.4    %           63.5            (0.1)    pts                    61.1    %                  57.9             3.2     pts
Underwriting expense ratio                      33.3                33.5            (0.2)                           33.2                       33.3            (0.1)
Dividends to policyholders ratio                 0.1                 0.2            (0.1)                            0.2                        0.2               -
Combined ratio                                  96.8                97.2            (0.4)                           94.5                       91.4             3.1



NPW growth of 11% in Third Quarter 2022 and 12% in Nine Months 2022 compared to
the same prior-year periods reflected (i) renewal pure price increases, (ii)
higher direct new business, and (iii) strong retention as shown in the table
below. In addition, NPW growth in both current-year periods benefited from
exposure growth.

                                                Quarter ended September 30,                              Nine Months ended September 30,
($ in millions)                               2022                       2021                2022                          2021
Direct new business premiums             $      128.2                     122.3                    $       385.6                       365.6
Retention                                          86    %                   86                               85    %                     85
Renewal pure price increases on
NPW                                               5.8                       5.3                              5.3                         5.5


The increase in NPEs in the third quarter and nine months of 2022 compared to the same
prior year periods resulted from the same impacts on NPW described above.

The loss and expense ratio decreased by 0.1 point in the third quarter of 2022 and
increased by 3.2 points over nine months 2022 compared to the same previous year
periods, mainly motivated by the following elements:

                                                       Third Quarter 2022                              Third Quarter 2021
                                                                                                Loss and
                                          Loss and Loss            Impact on                      Loss               Impact on
                                             Expense             Loss and Loss                  Expense            Loss and Loss
($ in millions)                              Incurred            Expense Ratio                  Incurred           Expense Ratio          Change in Ratio
Net catastrophe losses                    $      18.2                   2.6      pts          $    50.0                   8.1                  (5.5)   

points

Non-catastrophe property loss and
loss expenses                                   129.8                  18.7                        90.1                  14.5                   4.2
(Favorable) prior year casualty
reserve development                             (16.0)                 (2.3)                      (14.0)                 (2.3)                    -

Total                                           132.0                  19.0                       126.1                  20.3                  (1.3)

                                                        Nine Months 2022                                Nine Months 2021
                                                                                                Loss and
                                          Loss and Loss            Impact on                      Loss               Impact on
                                             Expense             Loss and Loss                  Expense            Loss and Loss
($ in millions)                              Incurred            Expense Ratio                  Incurred           Expense Ratio          Change in Ratio
Net catastrophe losses                    $      55.4                   2.7      pts          $    77.3                   4.3                  (1.6)   

points

Non-catastrophe property loss and
loss expenses                                   344.7                  16.9                       248.4                  13.7                   3.2
(Favorable) prior year casualty
reserve development                             (48.0)                 (2.4)                      (59.0)                 (3.3)                  0.9

Total                                           352.1                  17.2                       266.7                  14.7                   2.5



Compared to the same prior-year periods, Third Quarter and Nine Months 2022
included (i) lower net catastrophe losses, and (ii) an increase to the loss and
loss expense ratio of 0.9 points in Third Quarter 2022 and 0.3 points in Nine
Months 2022 due to higher ceded earned casualty reinstatement premium. See the
"Insurance Operations" section above for more information.

For quantitative information on favorable prior year casualty reserve
development by line of business, see the "Insurance Operations" section above.
For qualitative information about the significant drivers of this development,
see the line of business discussions below.

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The following is a discussion of our most significant Standard Commercial Lines
of business:

General Liability

                                              Quarter ended September 30,               Change                      Nine Months ended September 30,              Change
                                                                                          % or                                                                     % or
($ in thousands)                             2022                      2021             Points1                      2022                       2021             Points1
NPW                                     $   234,975                  216,897               8      %             $    736,561                  664,462              11      %
 Direct new business                         38,537                  
38,376                  n/a                    112,700                  109,803                  n/a
 Retention                                       86    %                  86                  n/a                         85    %                  85                  n/a
 Renewal pure price increases                   4.9                      4.4                  n/a                        4.4                      4.5                  n/a
NPE                                     $   225,302                  205,904               9      %             $    667,912                  596,717              12      %
Underwriting income                          21,943                   29,993             (27)                         75,765                   97,611             (22)
Combined ratio                                 90.3    %                85.4             4.9      pts                   88.7    %                83.6             5.1      pts
% of total Standard Commercial                   32                       33                                              33                       33
Lines NPW


1n/a: not applicable.

NPW growth of 8% in Third Quarter 2022 and 11% in Nine Months 2022 compared to
the same prior-year periods benefited from exposure growth, strong retention,
renewal pure price increases, and direct new business.

The combined ratio increased 4.9 points in Third Quarter 2022 and 5.1 points in
Nine Months 2022 compared to the same prior-year periods, partly driven by less
favorable prior year casualty reserve development, as follows:

                                                          Third Quarter 2022                               Third Quarter 2021
                                             Loss and Loss                                       Loss and Loss
                                                Expense               Impact on                     Expense               Impact on
($ in millions)                                 Incurred            Combined Ratio                  Incurred            Combined Ratio          Change in Ratio
(Favorable) prior year casualty
reserve development                          $         -                    -        pts         $      (4.0)                (1.9)                    1.9        pts

                                                           Nine Months 2022                                 Nine Months 2021
                                             Loss and Loss                                       Loss and Loss
                                                Expense               Impact on                     Expense               Impact on
($ in millions)                                 Incurred            Combined Ratio                  Incurred            Combined Ratio          Change in Ratio
(Favorable) prior year casualty
reserve development                          $      (5.0)                (0.7)       pts         $     (29.0)                (4.9)                    4.2        pts



The favorable prior year casualty reserve development in Nine Months 2022 was
primarily attributable to improved loss severities in accident years 2019 and
prior. The Third Quarter and Nine Months 2021 favorable prior year casualty
reserve development was primarily attributable to improved loss severities in
accident years 2018 and prior.

The increase in the combined ratio in the third quarter and nine months of 2022 also included
the following loss ratio and claims expense impacts:

•An increase in ceded earned casualty reinstatement premium, adding 1.9 points
in Third Quarter 2022 and 0.7 points in Nine Months 2022 compared to the same
prior-year periods, as discussed in the "Insurance Operations" section above;
and
•An increase in current year casualty loss costs of 0.7 points in Third Quarter
2022 and 0.5 points in Nine Months 2022 compared to the same prior-year periods,
in anticipation of higher loss trend for this line.

Commercial Automobile

                                              Quarter ended September 30,               Change                      Nine Months ended September 30,              Change
                                                                                          % or                                                                     % or
($ in thousands)                             2022                      2021             Points1                      2022                       2021             Points1
NPW                                     $   223,809                  197,459              13      %             $    659,251                  594,011              11      %
 Direct new business                         31,503                   28,968                  n/a                     92,795                   91,120                  n/a
 Retention                                       87    %                  87                  n/a                         86    %                  86                  n/a
 Renewal pure price increases                   8.7                      7.9                  n/a                        8.0                      8.6                  n/a
NPE                                     $   207,129                  185,610              12      %             $    599,340                  535,519              12      %
Underwriting (loss) income                  (30,612)                 (12,547)            144                         (45,790)                  (5,514)            730
Combined ratio                                114.8    %               106.8             8.0      pts                  107.6    %               101.0             6.6      pts
% of total Standard Commercial
Lines NPW                                        31                       30                                              30                       30


1n/a: not applicable.

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NPW growth of 13% in Third Quarter 2022 and 11% in Nine Months 2022 compared to
the same prior-year periods benefited from renewal pure price increases, higher
direct new business, and strong retention. NPW also benefited from 4% growth of
in-force vehicle counts as of September 30, 2022, compared to September 30,
2021.

The combined ratio increased 8.0 points in Third Quarter 2022 and 6.6 points in
Nine Months 2022 compared to the same prior-year periods, primarily driven by
the following:

                                                          Third Quarter 2022                               Third Quarter 2021
                                             Loss and Loss                                       Loss and Loss
                                                Expense               Impact on                     Expense               Impact on
($ in millions)                                 Incurred            Combined Ratio                  Incurred            Combined Ratio          Change in Ratio
Net catastrophe losses                       $       1.4                  0.7        pts         $       8.3                  4.4                    (3.7)       pts
Non-catastrophe property loss and loss
expenses                                            46.2                 22.3                           35.2                 18.9                    

3.4

Unfavorable prior year casualty
reserve development                                 15.0                  7.2                              -                    -                     7.2
Total                                        $      62.6                 30.2                    $      43.5                 23.3                     6.9

                                                           Nine Months 2022                                 Nine Months 2021
                                             Loss and Loss                                       Loss and Loss
                                                Expense               Impact on                     Expense               Impact on
($ in millions)                                 Incurred            Combined Ratio                  Incurred            Combined Ratio          Change in Ratio
Net catastrophe losses                       $       2.3                  0.4        pts         $       8.9                  1.7                    (1.3)       pts
Non-catastrophe property loss and loss
expenses                                           124.0                 20.7                           90.8                 16.9                    

3.8

Unfavorable prior year casualty
reserve development                                 15.0                  2.5                              -                    -                     2.5
Total                                        $     141.3                 23.6                    $      99.7                 18.6                     5.0



Compared to the same prior-year periods, Third Quarter and Nine Months 2022
experienced (i) lower net catastrophe losses, as discussed in the "Insurance
Operations" section above, and (ii) elevated non-catastrophe property loss and
loss expenses, primarily due to higher severities from inflationary and supply
chain impacts that have increased labor and material costs, as well as the
duration of claims, which impacts vehicle rental days.

The unfavorable prior year casualty reserve development in Third Quarter and
Nine Months 2022 was primarily due to increased severities in the 2021 accident
year. There was no prior year casualty reserve development in Third Quarter and
Nine Months 2021.

In addition, the combined ratio was impacted by a 0.9-point increase in current
year casualty loss costs in Third Quarter 2022 and a 1.5-point increase in Nine
Months 2022, compared to the same prior-year periods. The increase in current
year casualty loss costs in both periods was primarily due to an expected
increase in claim frequencies from a more normalized amount of miles driven as
COVID-19-related impacts continue to lessen.

Commercial Property

                                         Quarter ended September 30,               Change                      Nine Months ended September 30,              Change
                                                                                     % or                                                                     % or
($ in thousands)                        2022                      2021             Points1                      2022                       2021             Points1
NPW                                $   143,117                  124,725              15      %             $    414,170                  357,248              16      %
 Direct new business                    30,691                   28,024                  n/a                     89,826                   82,237                  n/a
 Retention                                  85    %                  85                  n/a                         84    %                  84                  n/a
Renewal pure price increases               6.2                      6.4                  n/a                        6.1                      6.0                  n/a
NPE                                $   128,268                  111,981              15      %             $    371,892                  320,904              16      %
Underwriting income                     (2,385)                 (12,137)             80                             608                   11,449             (95)
Combined ratio                           101.9    %               110.8            (8.9)     pts                   99.8    %                96.4             3.4      pts
% of total Standard
Commercial Lines NPW                        20                       19                                              19                       18


1n/a: not applicable.

NPW growth of 15% in the third quarter of 2022 and 16% over nine months of 2022 compared to
the same periods of the previous year benefited from pure renewal price increases,
increased exposure, strong retention and increased direct new business.

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The combined ratio decreased 8.9 points in Third Quarter 2022 and increased 3.4
points in Nine Months 2022 compared to the same prior-year periods, primarily
driven by the following:

                                                          Third Quarter 2022                                    Third Quarter 2021
                                             Loss and Loss
                                                Expense               Impact on                    Loss and Loss                   Impact on
($ in millions)                                 Incurred            Combined Ratio                Expense Incurred              Combined Ratio            Change in Ratio
Net catastrophe losses                       $      13.3                 10.4        pts                  32.8                         29.3                   (18.9)       pts
Non-catastrophe property loss and loss
expenses                                            69.4                 54.1                             48.8                         43.6                    10.5
Total                                        $      82.7                 64.5                             81.6                         72.9                    (8.4)

                                                           Nine Months 2022                                      Nine Months 2021
                                             Loss and Loss
                                                Expense               Impact on                    Loss and Loss                   Impact on
($ in millions)                                 Incurred            Combined Ratio                Expense Incurred              Combined Ratio            Change in Ratio
Net catastrophe losses                       $      45.4                 12.2        pts                  55.7                         17.3                    (5.1)       pts
Non-catastrophe property loss and loss
expenses                                           188.0                 50.6                            133.7                         41.7                     8.9
Total                                        $     233.4                 62.8                            189.4                         59.0                     3.8



Compared to the same prior-year periods, Third Quarter and Nine Months 2022
experienced (i) lower net catastrophe losses, as discussed in the "Insurance
Operations" section above, and (ii) elevated non-catastrophe property loss and
loss expenses. The elevated non-catastrophe property loss and loss expenses was
primarily due to increased severity compared to the same prior-year periods
reflecting period-to-period volatility generally associated with our commercial
property line of business and inflationary pressures on building material and
labor costs.

Workers Compensation

                                              Quarter ended September 30,               Change                      Nine Months ended September 30,              Change
                                                                                          % or                                                                     % or
($ in thousands)                             2022                      2021             Points1                      2022                       2021             Points1
NPW                                     $    74,698                   76,317              (2)     %             $    260,557                  249,099               5      %
Direct new business                          13,597                   15,408                  n/a                     47,552                   47,355                  n/a
Retention                                        85    %                  86                  n/a                         86    %                  86                  n/a
Renewal pure price increases                   (0.1)                       -                  n/a                       (0.4)                       -                  n/a
NPE                                     $    81,996                   78,318               5      %             $    250,178                  230,845               8      %
Underwriting income                          23,220                   15,527              50                          54,756                   44,631              23
Combined ratio                                 71.7    %                80.2            (8.5)     pts                   78.1    %                80.7            (2.6)     pts
% of total Standard Commercial
Lines NPW                                        10                       12                                              12                       12


1n/a: not applicable.

NPW did not significantly change in Third Quarter 2022 compared to Third Quarter
2021, but NPW increased 5% in Nine Months 2022 compared to Nine Months 2021 due
to exposure growth and strong retention.

The combined ratio decreased 8.5 points in Third Quarter 2022 and 2.6 points in
Nine Months 2022 compared to the same prior-year periods, primarily driven by
favorable prior year casualty reserve development, as follows:

                                                          Third Quarter 2022                               Third Quarter 2021
                                             Loss and Loss                                       Loss and Loss
                                                Expense               Impact on                     Expense               Impact on
($ in millions)                                 Incurred            Combined Ratio                  Incurred            Combined Ratio          Change in Ratio
(Favorable) prior year casualty
reserve development                          $     (20.0)               (24.4)       pts         $      (8.0)               (10.2)                  (14.2)       pts

                                                           Nine Months 2022                                 Nine Months 2021
                                             Loss and Loss                                       Loss and Loss
                                                Expense               Impact on                     Expense               Impact on
($ in millions)                                 Incurred            Combined Ratio                  Incurred            Combined Ratio          Change in Ratio
(Favorable) prior year casualty
reserve development                          $     (40.0)               (16.0)       pts         $     (28.0)               (12.1)                   (3.9)       pts



The favorable prior year casualty reserve development in Third Quarter and Nine
Months 2022 was primarily due to improved loss severities in accident years 2019
and prior. The favorable prior year casualty reserve development in Third
Quarter and Nine Months 2021 was primarily due to improved loss severities in
accident years 2018 and prior.

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Partially offsetting the increase in favorable prior year casualty reserve
development this year, was an increase in ceded earned casualty reinstatement
premium that impacted the loss and loss expense ratio by 4.2 points in Third
Quarter 2022 and 1.4 points in Nine Months 2022, compared to the same prior-year
periods, as discussed in the "Insurance Operations" section above.

Standard Personal Lines Segment

                                                 Quarter ended September 30,               Change                     Nine Months ended September 30,              Change
                                                                                            % or                                                                    % or
($ in thousands)                                2022                      2021             Points                      2022                       2021             Points
Insurance Segments Results:
NPW                                        $    86,844                   78,247              11     %             $    234,465                  221,883               6     %
NPE                                             75,638                   73,362               3                        221,618                  220,476               1
Less:
Loss and loss expense incurred                  57,263                   65,123             (12)                       172,396                  160,273               8
Net underwriting expenses incurred              19,760                   19,385               2                         56,454                   58,010              (3)
Underwriting income (loss)                      (1,385)                 (11,146)             88                   $     (7,232)                   2,193            (430)    %
Combined Ratios:
Loss and loss expense ratio                       75.7    %                88.8           (13.1)    pts                   77.8    %                72.7             5.1     pts
Underwriting expense ratio                        26.1                     26.4            (0.3)                          25.5                     26.3            (0.8)
Combined ratio                                   101.8                    115.2           (13.4)                         103.3                     99.0             4.3



NPW increased 11% in Third Quarter 2022 and 6% in Nine Months 2022 compared to
the same prior-year periods, due to (i) higher direct new business, (ii)
stronger retention, (iii) higher homeowner coverage amounts due to inflation
adjustments, and (iv) higher average policy sizes from our mass affluent market
strategy. In the third quarter of 2021, we transitioned our personal lines
strategy to targeting customers in the mass affluent market where we believe our
strong coverage and servicing capabilities will be more competitive.

                                                    Quarter ended September 30,                                   Nine Months ended September 30,
($ in millions)                                    2022                       2021                   2022                           2021
Direct new business premiums1                $        17.4                      10.2                       $         40.5                        31.0
Retention                                               85    %                   84                                   85    %                     83
Renewal pure price increases on NPW                    0.5                       1.2                                  0.6                         1.0


1Excludes our Direct Flood Incentives issued, which are 100% ceded to NFIP and
therefore, has no impact on our NPW.

The increase in NPEs in the third quarter and nine months of 2022 compared to the same
prior year periods resulted from the same impacts on NPW described above.

The loss and expense ratio decreased by 13.1 points in the third quarter of 2022 and
increased by 5.1 points over nine months 2022 compared to the same previous year
periods, motivated by the following elements:

                                                          Third Quarter 2022                                   Third Quarter 2021
                                             Loss and Loss            Impact on                   Loss and Loss                   Impact on
                                                Expense             Loss and Loss                    Expense                Loss and Loss Expense
($ in millions)                                 Incurred            Expense Ratio                    Incurred                       Ratio                Change in Ratio
Net catastrophe losses                       $      11.3                  14.9      pts                19.5                               26.7               (11.8)       pts
Non-catastrophe property loss and loss
expenses                                            29.0                  38.4                         28.7                               39.1                (0.7)

Flood claims handling fee
reimbursement                                       (2.7)                 (3.6)                        (2.9)                              (4.0)                0.4
Total                                        $      37.6                  49.7                         45.3                               61.8               (12.1)

                                                           Nine Months 2022                                     Nine Months 2021
                                             Loss and Loss            Impact on                   Loss and Loss                   Impact on
                                                Expense             Loss and Loss                    Expense                Loss and Loss Expense
($ in millions)                                 Incurred            Expense Ratio                    Incurred                       Ratio                Change in Ratio
Net catastrophe losses                       $      36.7                  16.5      pts                30.1                               13.7                 2.8        pts
Non-catastrophe property loss and loss
expenses                                            81.5                  36.8                         76.7                               34.8                 2.0

Flood claims handling fee
reimbursement                                       (4.0)                 (1.8)                        (4.5)                              (2.0)                0.2
Total                                        $     114.2                  51.5                        102.3                               46.5                 5.0



Third Quarter 2022 experienced lower net catastrophe losses compared to the same
prior-year period, as discussed in the "Insurance Operations" section above. Our
Third Quarter 2022 net catastrophe losses were impacted by Hurricane Ian, which
primarily affected the Southeastern states in our footprint in late September
2022. Partially offsetting these losses was $1.9 million of flood claims
handling fees. Nine Months 2022 experienced elevated net catastrophe losses
compared to the same
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prior-year period as a result of several Midwest wind and thunderstorm events
that occurred throughout the second quarter of 2022.

Nine Months 2022 experienced elevated non-catastrophe property loss and loss
expenses, driven by higher personal automobile physical damage losses. These
higher losses resulted from (i) higher frequencies from increased miles driven,
and (ii) greater severities from inflationary and supply chain impacts that have
increased labor and material costs, and the duration of claims, which impacts
vehicle rental days. The likely continuation of elevated non-catastrophe
property loss and loss expenses, coupled with renewal pure price increases below
loss trend, will put pressure on this segment's profitability in the near-term.
We are filing rate increases to mitigate these inflationary impacts.

E&S Lines Segment


                                              Quarter ended September 30,               Change                     Nine Months ended September 30,              Change
                                                                                         % or                                                                    % or
($ in thousands)                             2022                      2021             Points                      2022                       2021             Points
Insurance Segments Results:
NPW                                     $    89,087                   82,056               9     %             $    264,073                  227,109              16     %
NPE                                          85,804                   74,314              15                        244,840                  203,783              20
Less:
Loss and loss expense incurred               52,299                   46,643              12                        149,895                  131,850              14
Net underwriting expenses
incurred                                     27,489                   22,999              20                         78,632                   64,439              22
Underwriting income (loss)                    6,016                    4,672              29                   $     16,313                    7,494             118
Combined Ratios:
Loss and loss expense ratio                    61.0    %                62.8            (1.8)    pts                   61.2    %                64.7            (3.5)    pts
Underwriting expense ratio                     32.0                     30.9             1.1                           32.1                     31.6             0.5
Combined ratio                                 93.0                     93.7            (0.7)                          93.3                     96.3            (3.0)



NPW growth of 9% in Third Quarter 2022 and 16% in Nine Months 2022 compared to
the same prior-year periods reflected renewal pure price increases and higher
direct new business as shown in the table below. In addition, NPW growth in
Third Quarter and Nine Months 2022 benefited from exposure growth driven by
favorable E&S Lines marketplace conditions.

                                                Quarter ended September 30,                                  Nine Months ended September 30,
($ in millions)                                2022                       2021                   2022                          2021
Direct new business premiums             $        38.6                      35.7                       $       117.3                       100.7

Renewal pure price increases on
NPW                                                6.7    %                  5.6                                 7.1    %                    6.5


The increase in NPEs in the third quarter and nine months of 2022 compared to the same
prior year periods resulted from the same impacts on NPW described above.

The loss and expense ratio decreased by 1.8 points in the third quarter of 2022 and
3.5 points over nine months 2022 compared to the same periods of the previous year,
mainly motivated by the following:

                                                       Third Quarter 2022                                Third Quarter 2021
                                                                                                  Loss and
                                             Loss and Loss            Impact on                     Loss               Impact on
                                                Expense             Loss and Loss                 Expense            Loss and Loss
($ in millions)                                 Incurred            Expense Ratio                 Incurred           Expense Ratio          Change in Ratio
Net catastrophe losses                       $       4.6                   5.4      pts         $     6.8                   9.2                  (3.8) 

points

Non-catastrophe property loss and loss
expenses                                             8.7                  10.1                        4.8                   6.5                   3.6

Total                                        $      13.3                  15.5                  $    11.6                  15.7                  (0.2)

                                                        Nine Months 2022                                  Nine Months 2021
                                                                                                  Loss and
                                             Loss and Loss            Impact on                     Loss               Impact on
                                                Expense             Loss and Loss                 Expense            Loss and Loss
($ in millions)                                 Incurred            Expense Ratio                 Incurred           Expense Ratio          Change in Ratio
Net catastrophe losses                       $       8.1                   3.3      pts         $    21.5                  10.5      pts         (7.2) 

points

Non-catastrophe property loss and loss
expenses                                            30.2                  12.4                       21.5                  10.5                   1.9
(Favorable) prior year casualty
reserve development                                    -                     -                       (7.0)                 (3.4)                  3.4
Total                                        $      38.3                  15.7                  $    36.0                  17.6                  (1.9)



Third Quarter and Nine Months 2022 experienced lower net catastrophe losses
compared to the same prior-year periods, primarily due to (i) Hurricane Ida in
2021, and (ii) a series of large storms that significantly impacted Texas and
other Southern and Midwestern states in Nine Months 2021. These catastrophe
events resulted in greater net catastrophe losses in Third
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Quarter and Nine Months 2021 compared to events in Third Quarter and Nine Months
2022.

Third Quarter and Nine Months 2022 experienced elevated non-catastrophe property
loss and loss expenses compared to the same prior-year periods, primarily due to
increased severity that reflects the normal period-to-period volatility of our
property lines of business in this segment and inflationary pressures on labor
and material costs.

There was no prior year casualty reserve development in Third Quarter and Nine
Months 2022. The favorable prior year casualty reserve development in Nine
Months 2021 was primarily due to lower loss severities in accident years 2016
through 2018.

In addition, the loss and loss expense ratio was favorably impacted by a
1.6-point decrease in current year casualty loss costs in both Third Quarter
2022 and Nine Months 2022 compared to the same prior year periods. Our E&S
casualty lines results have improved over recent years after several
underwriting and claims initiatives and strong rate increases. The decrease in
current year casualty loss costs reflects the impacts of these actions.

The underwriting expense ratio increased 1.1 points in Third Quarter 2022
compared to Third Quarter 2021, primarily due to an increase of (i) 0.7 points
in labor expenses, and (ii) 0.4 points in commissions. In addition, the
underwriting expense ratio increased 0.5 points in Nine Months 2022 compared to
Nine Months 2021, primarily due to increased travel expenses.

Reinsurance

We have successfully concluded negotiations for our July 1, 2022 stop loss
treaties, which cover our Standard Business Lines, our Standard Personal Lines,
and E&S Lines.

We have renewed the Accident Treaty with substantially the same structure as the
expiring treaty. Treaty year 2022 deposit bonus increased by $16.2
million
or 23%, reflecting a higher premium earned per subject expected due to
growth in our business portfolio and increases in pure renewal rates, coupled with a
modest increase in the risk-adjusted reinsurance rate.

The Property Excess of Loss Treaty ("Property Treaty") was renewed with a $10
million limit increase in the highest layer. The treaty year 2022 deposit
premium increased by $11.3 million, or 28%, from 2021, reflecting (i) an
increase in projected subject premium driven by growth in total insured values,
insured locations, and rate increases on our underlying policies, (ii) the
purchase of additional coverage, and (iii) risk-adjusted insurance rate
increases. We anticipate the increase in expected ceded premium will be
partially offset by the premium reduction benefit of reduced facultative
reinsurance placements resulting from the higher treaty limit.

The following table summarizes the Treaty of Goods and the Treaty of Damages
systems covering our Insurance Subsidiaries:

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Berkeley Environmental Law Clinic represents environmental justice group in lawsuit https://proactnow.org/berkeley-environmental-law-clinic-represents-environmental-justice-group-in-lawsuit/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 03:08:43 +0000 https://proactnow.org/berkeley-environmental-law-clinic-represents-environmental-justice-group-in-lawsuit/

UC Berkeley Law’s Environmental Law Clinic is representing Communities for a Better Environment, or CBE, in a lawsuit against the AB&I Foundry in East Oakland and the area’s Air Quality Management District of the bay, or BAAQMD.

The lawsuit alleges that AB&I’s air pollution combined with BAAQMD’s failure to regulate has resulted in cancer risk and other health issues for East Oakland residents.

“What’s causing the cases is the community’s long-standing dissatisfaction with BAAQMD not listening to the community,” said Steve Castleman, clinical supervising attorney for the Law Clinic. Berkeley environment. “This is a long-standing issue with particularly low-income and minority communities like those around AB&I in East Oakland.”

Castleman noted that the Environmental Law Clinic is pro bono, or free, working almost exclusively on environmental justice cases like this.

According to the litigation, the toxic odors significantly affected the surrounding community of more than 50,000 people living within a one-mile radius of AB&I as well as thousands more who live outside that radius.

Castleman noted that the community surrounding AB&I includes many young children, and having to breathe polluted air for another six years will affect their health as well as the rest of the community.

“I’m so sick of AB&I getting away with polluting the community and causing a nuisance with the toxic smells they emit,” East Oakland resident Jasmine Gonzalez said in a press release from the October 25 from the Law Clinic and the CBE.

According to a statement on behalf of AB&I Foundry, they have ceased manufacturing operations at the East Oakland plant and plan to vacate the property by the end of January 2023.

Kristina Chu, communications manager at BAAQMD, noted that pressure from the air district, other government agencies and CBE led to the closure of the AB&I facility.. She added that the Air District co-hosted a public workshop with CBE as part of an extensive outreach process.

“Air District is overseeing the site closure and cleanup process to ensure all air quality regulations are met during the facility’s closure,” Chu said in an email.

Despite the shutdown, litigation is expected to move forward, Castleman said.

According to Tyler Earl, a CBE attorney, BAAQMD failed to consult the public and extended the deadline for AB&I and other polluters to comply with the 11-18 rule by six years.

This rule, Earl noted, was adopted by the BAAQMD and is intended to reduce public health risks from industrial polluters in the area. According to the litigation, the rule sets regulatory thresholds for health risks called “risk action levels.”

Earl added that they hope the lawsuit enforces the implementation of this rule which incorporates required input from residents and protects communities from toxic pollution.

“This case is significant because it represents the culmination of more than a decade of community organizing and environmental justice action against AB&I’s pollution and against BAAQMD’s unwillingness to act,” Earl said in a statement. E-mail. “It demonstrates the power of the community to stand up and fight back when regulators tasked with protecting their health are instead protecting the wallets of polluters.”

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Credit Suisse Group’s Recent Short Interest Review – Credit Suisse Group (NYSE:CS) https://proactnow.org/credit-suisse-groups-recent-short-interest-review-credit-suisse-group-nysecs/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 20:24:47 +0000 https://proactnow.org/credit-suisse-groups-recent-short-interest-review-credit-suisse-group-nysecs/

of the Credit Suisse Group CS short percentage of free float has fallen 40.74% since its last report. The company recently announced that it has 12.58 million shares sold short, or 0.48% of all common shares available for trading. Based on its trading volume, it would take traders an average of 0.8 days to cover their short positions.

Why short interest matters

Short interest is the number of shares that have been sold short but have not yet been covered or closed. Short selling is when a trader sells shares of a company they don’t own, hoping the price will go down. Traders make money from short selling if the stock price goes down and they lose if it goes up.

Short-term interest is important to track as it can act as an indicator of market sentiment towards a particular security. An increase in short interest may signal that investors have become more bearish, while a decrease in short interest may signal that they have become more bullish.

See also: List of best-selling stocks

Credit Suisse Group Short Interest Chart (3 months)

As you can see from the chart above, the percentage of stocks sold short for Credit Suisse Group has declined since its last report. This does not mean the stock will rise in the short term, but traders should be aware that fewer stocks are being sold short.

Comparison of Credit Suisse Group’s short-term interest rates with its peers

Peer comparison is a popular technique among analysts and investors to assess a company’s performance. A company’s peer is another company that has similar characteristics, such as industry, size, age, and financial structure. You can find a company’s peer group by reading its 10-K, proxy filing, or by performing your own similarity analysis.

According to Benzinga Pro, the Credit Suisse Group peer group average for short interest as a percentage of free float is 0.37%, meaning the company has After short interest than most of his peers.

Did you know that increasing short-term interest can actually be bullish for a share? This Benzinga Money article explains how you can take advantage of it..

This article was generated by Benzinga’s automated content engine and has been reviewed by an editor.

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Ninth Circuit Rules vs. David Daleiden, Pro-Life Group https://proactnow.org/ninth-circuit-rules-vs-david-daleiden-pro-life-group/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 16:02:00 +0000 https://proactnow.org/ninth-circuit-rules-vs-david-daleiden-pro-life-group/

David Daleiden, pictured February 4, 2016 in Houston outside the Harris County Courthouse.

The pro-life group behind a misleading video allegedly selling aborted fetal tissue has lost its appeal of Planned Parenthood’s $2.4 million judgment against them, as a federal appeals court upheld all but one jury’s findings unanimously.

A deceptively edited video made in 2016 by the anti-abortion group Center for Medical Progress purported to show that Planned Parenthood was profiting financially from the illegal sale of fetal tissue from abortions performed on its premises. Allegations of wrongdoing were summarily denied by Planned Parenthood and were repeatedly dismissed by the Justice Department; the video has been discredited.

The video was pieced together using footage the pro-life activists secretly obtained by posing as representatives of a fake fabric supply company and attending lunch meetings and tours sites with Planned Parenthood staff. The accused activists involved used fake driver’s licenses, pseudonyms and fake business cards, as well as hidden cameras.

After the making of the video was investigated by law enforcement, the Center for Medical Progress founder and pro-life activist David Daleiden faced charges in Texas and California for his alleged role in the incident.

Planned Parenthood sued the Center for Medical Progress and those involved, and after a six-week trial, the defendants were found guilty of trespassing, fraud, conspiracy, breach of contract, illegal and fraudulent business practices. , violating civil RICO, and violating various federal and state wiretapping laws. Planned Parenthood was awarded $2.4 million in statutory, compensatory and punitive damages, and injunctive relief.

The defendants appealed the verdict, and the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit upheld nearly all of the lower court’s rulings on Friday. The appeals court reversed the jury’s verdict only on the Federal Wiretap Act claim and related damages.

American circuit judge Ronald Gould (a bill clinton named) wrote for the Ninth Circuit’s three-judge panel, rejecting the activists’ argument that their wrongdoing was protected First Amendment activity. Gould wrote that the right to free speech is an insufficient justification for unlawful conduct. Chief Judge Mary H. Murguia and U.S. District Judge (sitting by designation) Nancy D. Freudenthal (both barack obama named), made up the rest of the panel:

From the outset of their scheme, the appellants engaged in unlawful behavior – including forging signatures, creating and obtaining false driver’s licenses and breaching contracts – which the jury found so reprehensible that they awarded punitive damages to Planned Parenthood. Journalism and investigative reporting have long played a vital role in our society. But journalism and investigative reporting do not require illegal conduct. In upholding Planned Parenthood’s compensatory damages as a result of the appellants’ First Amendment challenge, we are simply reaffirming the established principle that the prosecution of journalism does not give license to violate laws of general application.

The panel noted that given the wrongdoings of activists, Planned Parenthood could have recovered even if there had never been a release of the secretly recorded videos.

The only part the panel chose to strike out — the Federal Wiretap Act claim — accounted for less than $100,000 of the $2.4 million in damages assessed by the trial court. The panel concluded that under the law, recording by a party to a conversation is permitted. This part of the verdict amounted to less than $100,000 in damages.

In a statement posted online, the Center for Medical Progress responded to the Ninth Circuit’s decision by doubling down:

A Ninth Circuit panel ruled with this ruling today that protecting the barbaric practices of partial-birth abortion and trafficking of aborted fetuses from Planned Parenthood for government-sponsored experiments is more important than protecting human rights. First Amendment from journalists and the public. To do this, the panel had to contradict its own precedents for undercover reporting on any other subject, ignore other circuits bench findings of wrongdoing by Planned Parenthood, and bless the growing militarization of the justice system against pro-life speech. The course of history is turning against the panel’s outdated pro-abortion exceptionalism, and we will appeal until the constitutional rights of journalists and the public prevail.

Planned Parenthood said in a statement that it was “delighted” with the appeals court’s decision:

We are delighted with today’s decision. In 2019, a jury – with all the facts fully presented to it – determined that David Daleiden and the Center for Medical Progress intentionally broke the law during a multi-year campaign to advance their anti-abortion agenda and prevent Planned Parenthood from serving the patients who depend on us. Daleiden was ordered to pay millions of dollars in damages as a result. Today, the 9th United States Circuit Court of Appeals upheld those rulings, once again clarifying that the only people who engaged in wrongdoing were those behind this malicious fraud. It was never about monetary gain; it was to expose the fraudulent and illegal actions of Daleiden and those who conspired with him, and to ensure that Planned Parenthood providers can continue to serve the 2.1 million patients who rely on them for high quality health care every year.

[Image via Eric Kayne/Getty Images]

Do you have a tip we should know? [email protected]

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Pamplin Media Group – OPINION: Choosing to protect your choice in November https://proactnow.org/pamplin-media-group-opinion-choosing-to-protect-your-choice-in-november/ Sat, 22 Oct 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://proactnow.org/pamplin-media-group-opinion-choosing-to-protect-your-choice-in-november/

Janeen Sollman: “I will continue to advocate for reproductive rights, access to abortion, and unfettered access to health care.”

When the United States Supreme Court overturned the longstanding Roe v. Wade this summer, like many of my constituents, I had a stomach ache.

As a mother, grandmother, and legislator, I knew the progress this has set back for so many Americans. I feared the devastating effects this would have – the right to make your own decisions about your body has been taken away from you by the federal government.

While I took some comfort in the safeguards that Oregon lawmakers, myself included, have passed in recent years to reaffirm this right in our state, I knew the impacts would still be significant.

Three weeks after the decision was announced, I visited Idaho for the Council of State Governments-West (CSG West) conference with legislative colleagues from across the country. The reality of the decision really hit me when I was in our neighboring state.

Idaho has a trigger law banning abortion in almost all cases that went into effect after the Supreme Court ruling. I could only imagine how this monumental change might impact people walking next to me on the sidewalk or sitting at a table in a restaurant. In Idaho’s conservative-controlled legislature, there’s no relief for residents who need abortions — except likely to travel here in Oregon.

My advocacy for reproductive rights began when I served on the Hillsboro school board and advocated for widespread access to comprehensive sex education and contraceptives.

Research shows us that education and access to contraception help reduce abortions. Many of us know people whose lives have been affected in one way or another by teenage pregnancies.

Much like the ongoing fight for reproductive rights, simply providing contraceptives in our school health centers was an uphill battle. In 2016, a conservative majority opposed such efforts. We kept moving forward, and in 2018 Hillsboro School District made contraception widely available to students as part of their healthcare programs. Students can be prescribed contraceptives at the school health center. Under Oregon law, children as young as 15 can seek medical care without parental approval and students of any age can seek contraceptive services without parental approval.

When I joined the State Legislature in 2016, ensuring that the right to choose was protected for all Oregonians was one of my top priorities. I am proud to have sponsored and supported the Reproductive Health Equity Act of 2017, which establishes Oregon as a leader in the United States in protecting abortion access and expands health services regardless of income level.

My advocacy has continued throughout my tenure in the Legislative Assembly, and earlier this year, as a Senator, I supported a $15 million investment package to expand the network’s providers and support for people accessing abortion-related health care. I am proud to be the only candidate for Senatorial District 15 endorsed by Oregon’s Planned Parenthood PAC and Pro-Choice Oregon PAC.

In a post-Roe world, we cannot afford to elect to the Legislative Assembly anyone who opposes abortion or supports it with caveats.

Oregonians have voted time and time again to protect access to abortion care. Access to abortion should not depend on who you are or where you live. It’s a personal decision. Abortion bans do not eliminate abortions – they endanger women’s lives by making abortions unsafe and increase inequality by placing the burden largely on those who cannot afford to travel.

In Oregon, abortion is legal, accessible and safe. As a Senator, I will continue to be a champion for reproductive rights, access to abortion, and unfettered access to health care.

I would be honored to have your vote by November 8th.

Janeen Sollman is a state senator for Senate District 15, including Hillsboro, Forest Grove and Cornelius. Democrat, she lives in Hillsboro.


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